Dan Centinello’s Political Quick Guide: Three Eco-Friendly Conservatives

In the last 20 years, more people have heightened their environmental awareness. According to a 2014 Huffington Post article, Americans increasingly understand the planet’s limited resources and ecosystems. Here are two Conservative thinkers who are at the forefront of the growing movement around environmental issues. These individuals are stepping up to promote eco-friendly solutions and working to change the way we see our role in the world.

Bob Inglis

Bob Inglis, a former congressman from South Carolina, is the executive director of RepublicEn, the conservative organization dedicated to fighting climate change.  Inglis has been called “America’s best hope for near-term climate action” and his leadership has been paving the way for a bold response to the matter.

Last May, Inglis told Salon:

“Too often the environmental left presents only the danger and not the opportunity of climate change. Of course, it’s a danger—the science is very clear. But it’s also an incredible free-enterprise opportunity, because why do we have to be dependent on these stinky fuels? Why can’t we have cleaner air? Why can’t we have distributed energy systems that light up the world with more energy, more mobility, and more freedom? Why can’t we?”

With Inglis’s pragmatic approach, the climate discussion encourages relevant action, as opposed to implied judgment for consumers’ so-called lack of initiative.

Lindsey Graham

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) valiantly defended his position on the environment during his short 2015 campaign for the Republican nomination for president. Although Graham didn’t win the nomination, he successfully became a voice for the growing conservative awareness about the impact of climate change. Scientific American reports that “the number of conservative voters who believe in climate change has almost doubled in the past two years.”

In an interview with Fox News Sunday, Senator Graham (R-SC) called “climate change ‘real’ but rejected cap and trade as the policy mechanism to address the issue. ‘I would like to clean up the air and water, become more energy independent, create jobs,’ Graham said. ‘I’d like a lower carbon economy over time.’”

Of course, Senator Graham and Bob Inglis are just two of the bright minds of the Party who are lending their insight and expertise to the cause of environmentalism. Despite what some of us might read in the news or see in headlines, many conservatives are taking vital roles on this critical subject.

Dan Centinello‘s experience includes two presidential campaigns, two gubernatorial campaigns, a senatorial campaign, and numerous roles with national and state political parties. With such an extensive resume, Dan Centinello stands out as an accomplished political industry veteran with more than ten years of experience across dozens of states and multiple countries.  Follow Dan on Twitter and Instagram.

Dan Centinello’s Look at Past Politics in the 1940s

When most people think of the 1940s, World War II is probably the first thing that comes to mind, and rightly so. As the most widespread and deadliest war in history, it lasted from 1939-1945 and encroached upon virtually all aspects of American life, even pop culture. America was still recovering from the Great Depression when suddenly the country had to shift all of its resources into the war effort, which ultimately ended the Depression once and for all.

As you can expect, politics of the decade were largely influenced by the War. Here, I take a look at some of the important events that occurred in American politics between 1940 and 1949.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt Elected for Third Term

On November 5, 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt became the first man to hold office for three terms, after his efforts to rescue America from Depression with his New Deal policies the previous decade. He had a 449 to 82 Electoral College Victory over Republican candidate Wendell Wilkie. Roosevelt went on to be elected for four terms, but it was after his death that Congress passed an amendment that no president should serve more than two terms.

Atlantic Charter is Issued

On August 14, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill signed a joint agreement between the U.S. and British War Aims, as allies against Axis forces. The Charter was significant in solidifying the alliance between the U.S. and Britain, setting forth Roosevelt’s vision of a postwar world with freer exchanges of trade between nations, and serving as an inspiration for Third World colonists fighting for independence.

G.I. Bill of Rights Goes Into Effect

On June 22, 1944, the G.I. Bill of Rights went into effect, granting a variety of benefits, such as education and unemployment compensation, to veterans returning from war.

Executive Order 9981

Harry S. Truman, who became president in April 1945 following FDR’s sudden death, passed Executive Order 998, ending segregation in the United States military; of course, America still had a long way to go before the end of segregation entirely.