Age Restrictions & Requirements in Politics (A Global Look)

How old does a leader need to be to have our trust? The answer varies across nations; some say the voting age of 18 is old enough even for a president. Others urge caution and set the age bar  as high as forty. Oftentimes, elected offices in regional and local offices also have determinations for how old a candidate must be before presenting themselves as a candidate. Differences aside, all nations lay out specific requirements for their leaders. I outline just a few of the nation-specific guidelines that aspiring leaders must adhere to in the post below.

 

Canada:

All candidates who seek public office must be at least 18 to run in an election. The exception to this is for senators, who must be at least 30 and own a minimum of $4,000 worth of land in their appointed province. Candidates must additionally possess property or assets valued at $4,000 more than their totaled debts and liabilities.

 

Current President: Justin Trudeau, age 45. Trudeau is the second-youngest president in Canada’s history behind Joe Clark, who was sworn into office on the eve of his 40th birthday.

 

France

In France, presidential candidates must be at least 18 years old. Interestingly, this is below the 24 years required of a senatorial candidate.

Current President: Emmanuel Macron, age 39. Macron is the youngest president in France’s history.

 

Germany

Candidates for the German presidency must be at least 40 years old at the time of their candidacy. All other local, regional, and national elected positions require their candidates to be 18 and over.

 

Current President: Frank-Walter Steinmeier, age 61

Current Prime Minister: Angela Merkel, age 63

 

United States

Presidential and vice-presidential candidates must be at least 35 to run for office. The requirement stands at 30 for senators and 25 for representatives. On the regional level, states set their own rules regarding age specifications for positions such as the governorship. Usually, though, these candidates are required to be 18 or 21 in order to run.

 

Current President: Donald Trump, age 71

 

United Kingdom

Excepting Scotland (whose age limit is set at 16), candidates must be at least 18 years of age to run for all parliamentary, assembly, and council positions. This rule applies not only to national-level UK positions, but also to those at European, devolved, or local level. The age for candidacy was 21 until 2006, when it was officially lowered by the Electoral Administration Act.

 

Current Prime Minister: Theresa May, age 61

 

The Rise of Airbnb in Europe

Airbnb co-founders Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia have come a long way from renting out airbeds on the floor of their San Francisco apartment and hawking cereal boxes to their guests to make ends meet. With millions of apartments listed worldwide, the company’s current value stands at $31 billion, positioning it as the second-most profitable startup next to the ride-hail giant Uber. In March, financial papers reported that Airbnb’s Q3 numbers leapt a full 50% since the same time the previous year. The online service’s major successes may be due in part to its branding – Airbnb sets itself apart from other hospitality services by marketing itself as a waymaker for experience, rather than as a mere booking service. With Airbnb, the service explains, visitors can step beyond the typically packaged tourist experience and live as a local. This pitch has brought them far in their stateside expansions and is demonstrating similar success in nations abroad.

 

However, financial gains haven’t been limited to the company alone. In 2015, European hosts collectively made about $3 billion in revenue from their short-term rentals. Studies conducted by the platform’s research group further found that Airbnb guests tend to stay twice as long and spend twice as much locally than those who use traditional hotel services, with a full 42% of guest spending taking place in host neighborhoods. Analysts with the site postulate that this high guest engagement is due to Airbnb’s mission to facilitate authentic experiences; guests want to explore, rather than follow a predetermined “tourist” itinerary. Thus, Airbnb has a considerable positive impact on both domestic and international economies; in my current home city of Barcelona, the platform estimates that it generated over $175 million in 2013 alone, and further supported approximately 4,000 jobs.

 

That said, Airbnb is not content with the passive benefits it provides to city centers across the globe – it wants to do more. After releasing projections that the company will have boosted European economies by 340 billion euros by 2020, Airbnb announced its intent to invest 5 million euros in “ongoing investments for innovative, locally sourced projects” that vitalize authentic, local experiences. This is hardly a new move for the platform; to date, Airbnb has supported local projects in Barcelona, Berlin, Bologna, Dublin, Hamburg, Lisbon, Milan, and London. Airbnb has also committed itself to providing authentic travel experiences for its users by offering over 2,500 activities and tours across the world. Recently, the site even partnered with Vice Media to curate specialized tours in South Africa, Paris, New York, and Tokyo. While these planned travel experiences are offered as contest prizes to promote the partnership, they will soon be available for purchase to the general public.

 

Tourism has been forever changed by Airbnb’s entrance onto the international playing field, and we are all the better for it. Gone are the days of tourism homogenization; of grinding a city’s culture into digestible chunks for visitors. Today, travelers prize the authentic experiences that Airbnb facilitates. Airbnb has revolutionized tourism on a global scale – and we are all the better for it.

Upcoming SCOTUS Cases

No voter wants their representative to be stuck in yesterday’s news cycle. While many might not realize it, important cases are argued and ruled upon every single day; the Supreme Court alone reviews around 7,000 – 8,000 cases per term. Each of these cases has the potential to spark public interest or open the door to vital legislative reviews, making it vital for any politician worth his office to keep his ear to the ground and take notice of high-profile Supreme Court cases. I find this to be especially important today, given our currently intense political atmosphere.

 

Below, I have listed a couple of important Supreme Court cases currently under review. However, if you wish to delve deeper into these and other current cases, visit the Supreme Court of the United States’ blog for more information.

 

Collins v. Virginia

 

Case Granted: September 28, 2017

Current Status: Pending

 

Context: This case questions whether police officers violated Ray Austin Collins’ fourth amendment rights when they lifted a tarp covering a motorcycle in his driveway during the course of investigation to determine whether the motorcycle was the same one used to elude police detainment on several previous occasions. The officers arrived at Collins’ residence after seeing him violate several traffic laws while riding the motorcycle. After confirming that the motorcycle was the one they had seen, the officers waited for him to return home. Under questioning, the defendant admitted to having bought the vehicle despite knowing that it was stolen.

 

Question at hand: Given that the police crossed onto Collins’ private property and lifted the tarp to confirm the motorcycle without a warrant, should the motorcycle be suppressed as evidence or upheld under the automobile exception to the fourth amendment?

 

Class v. United States

 

Case Granted: February 21, 2017

Current Status: Pending

 

Context: In May of 2013, Rodney Class represented himself to the District of Columbia Circuit and pleaded guilty to possessing three firearms on United States Capitol Grounds. He later appealed this ruling under the argument that his conviction was unconstitutional, though the appellate court affirmed the original guilty ruling.

 

Question at hand: Does a guilty plea bar a defendant from arguing against the constitutionality of his conviction?  
These are only two of many intriguing cases; those who wish to keep current on Supreme Court cases and rulings should bookmark the SCOTUS Blog as a resource. The SCOTUS Blog not only provides a record of cases on and beyond the docket, but also offers informative posts and insights into ruling implications.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Press Conferences

 

Holding a press conference is a little like setting off a flare. Attracted by the noise and the promise of a good story, reporters will flock to your venue in the hopes of finding the next morning’s headlines. These media events serve as useful opportunities to share information and take ownership of potentially inflammatory stories before political rivals or unfriendly foes do. However, like flares, press conferences have the potential to burn a candidate if enacted incorrectly. In this post, I’ve outlined a few of the basic do’s and don’ts of holding press conferences for new candidates.

 

DO

Have a good reason for holding one.

Never hold a press conference to share banal information, and only hold media events when necessary. Reporters’ time is valuable; if media representatives don’t think attending your press conference will lead to a good story, they won’t attend. Save your candidate the potential embarrassment of an empty room by only holding press conferences on subjects you know will draw a crowd. Schedule an event if you need to share big news or if the office phones are ringing non-stop for comment – but find other means of communication for day-to-day news!

 

DON’T

Show up without a plan.

Press conferences place a candidate and/or his representative under intense media scrutiny. An off-the-cuff comment or half-considered remark can dominate the news cycle for days – so prepare appropriately! Have remarks and talking points prepared, and keep any communication brief. Keep in mind that press conferences should never drag on for over 45 minutes.

 

DO

Have a press release and press kit prepared.

If you don’t provide reporters with a narrative about the news you share, they’ll likely dig for one themselves – and you might not like the story they settle on. Make sure that you present members of the media with documents that outline your positions and reasonings in a good light. Candidates should at the very least provide a press release overviewing the news they plan to share – however, putting together a press kit is preferable. Expensive as they are, press kits are useful; they contain background context for the issue at hand, the candidate’s position, argument highlights, related news stories, and biographies of conference speakers.

 

DON’T

Answer unrelated or inflammatory questions

As I mentioned earlier, an unfortunately worded answer can negatively dominate the news cycle for days at a time – and often, reporters try to throw speakers off in order to get a juicy comment. If a media representative asks an unrelated or inflammatory question that has the potential to yank the conference off-track, make sure that the conference moderator shuts down the conversation before it becomes damaging to the task at hand.

 

Remember, the press is an invaluable resource for any candidate – but communication with it must be conducted with careful thought and strategy.