Tag Archives: Eisenhower

The Art of Campaign Ads

The ultimate idea of a political campaign is to engage communities. Candidates give speeches, for example, that they hope will resonate with their constituents-to-be and inspire them to vote. Today, thanks to the proliferation of new technology, there are more ways than ever to engage members of the public through avenues like social media, the internet, and of course, campaign ad videos.

These videos, which are typically about a minute long, allow candidates to present their position or attitude on an issue, discuss their philosophy, and speak directly to voters. One of the many benefits of campaign ads are their tremendous reach: In presidential elections, for example, campaign ads can reach as many as 87 percent of American adults, which makes them an invaluable medium for candidates who want their message to reach the largest audience possible.

Campaign videos first came onto the political scene during the 1950s, as more and more Americans were bringing television sets into their homes; in 1952, Dwight D. Eisenhower became the first presidential candidate to incorporate video ads into his campaign, and they were wildly successful.

Since the 50s, the popularity, scale, and scope of campaign videos has increased dramatically. Today, they are a fixture of races at every level, from presidential contests to local elections and even referendums or ballot initiatives. In fact, Lincoln Strategy Group develops campaign ads for its clients, including these two videos which were designated Gold Winners in the 2017 AVA Digital Awards.

We were honored to receive these accolades for our work, but beyond that, we were particularly proud that we were able to present such a strong articulation of our clients’ message, whether it was in support of clean energy initiatives in Nevada or for quality leadership in Arizona. And we’re happy to say that both campaigns were successful!

While there are myriad approaches to producing a political campaign ad, many voters tend to dislike ads that “go negative,” or deliver ad hominem attacks against specific candidates. Instead, voters prefer positive or optimistic ads, such as President Ronald Reagan’s 1984 campaign ad, “Prouder, Stronger, Better,” more commonly known as “Morning in America.” It remains one of the most celebrated campaign ads in American political history.

Before the Oval Office: The Careers of Former Presidents before Politics

A candidate for President of the United States is expected to have a wide range of expertise, knowledge, and leadership experience if they hope to win election to the highest office in the land. But how exactly does a president-to-be go about accumulating the necessary experience to hold the job? Is there a precise formula of work history, education, and civic engagement that brings on a win in the electoral college? Not exactly—in fact no two presidents’ former careers are the same. Take a look at the careers of several former presidents before they ascended to the Oval Office.

George W. Bush (2001-2009)

After service in the Air Force, in 1977, Bush founded an oil exploration company called Arbusto Energy that was later renamed Bush Exploration. The company then merged with Spectrum 7, another oil company, and Bush subsequently became Spectrum 7’s Chairman and CEO. In 1986, Harken Energy Corporation bought Spectrum 7; Bush was appointed to Harken’s Board of Directors, a post which he held until 1993.

Bush also famously purchased a controlling interest in the Texas Rangers in 1989, and he served as the managing general partner for five years. He was a common face at many games where he enjoyed sitting in the stands with fans.

Ronald Reagan (1981-1989)

Following his graduation from Eureka College in 1932, Reagan moved to Iowa and found work as a radio personality and announcer for Chicago Cubs games. While traveling with the Cubs in California, Reagan began his career as an actor by signing a seven-year screen contract with Warner Brothers Studios.

By 1939, he had appeared in 19 films, and thanks to his performance as George Gipp in 1940’s Knute Rockne, All American, Reagan earned the lifelong nickname of “The Gipper.” His favorite role, and perhaps his most famous, was as double-amputee Drake McHugh in the 1942 film King’s Row. In 1947, he was elected President of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and he was reelected to the position seven times.

Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-1961)

Eisenhower attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Army after graduating. He served at bases across the country as well as in the Panama Canal Zone and the Philippines. During World War II, he was promoted to the role of Supreme Allied Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe, where he planned the invasion of Normandy and oversaw Allied operations until Germany’s eventual surrender in 1945.

After World War II, Eisenhower served as President of Columbia University in New York City. In 1948, he returned to active military service as the first Supreme Allied Commander Europe of the newly-formed North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).